Trip idea in South Africa

A Honeymoon in South Africa and Mauritius

Trip cost ex. international flights
from £9,310 per person
Duration
17 days
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Discover the wine and wildlife of South Africa and the white sand beaches of Mauritius on this luxury honeymoon tour. ➣ Explore Cape Town and ascend the iconic Table Mountain. ➣ Take a vintage tram ride through the wine estates of Franschhoek and taste wines with a local expert. ➣ Enjoy game drives in Sabi Sands private reserve and spot the Big 5. ➣ Have a romantic candlelit dinner on the veranda of your honeymoon suite. ➣ Relax on the white sand beaches of Belle Mare, one of the most pristine resorts in Mauritius.

We will tailor this trip to you. Change anything - from excursions to accommodation to places visited.

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Cape Town
Day 1
Cape Town
  • Private taxi transfer from Cape Town International Airport to your guest house.
Cape Town
Day 2
Cape Town
  • Visit Robben Island
  • At leisure in Cape Town
Cape Town
Day 3
Cape Town
  • Ascend Table Mountain
  • Explore Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens
Cape Town
Day 4
Cape Town
  • Visit the Cape of Good Hope
  • Visit to Klein Constantia Wine Farms
Franschhoek
Day 5
Franschhoek
  • Transfer from Cape Town to Franschhoek
  • Afternoon at leisure in Franschhoek
Franschhoek
Day 6
Franschhoek
  • Ride the Franschoek wine tram with a local guide
Sabi Sands
Day 7
Sabi Sands
  • Transfer from Franschhoek to Cape Town International Airport
  • Flight from Cape Town International Airport to Skukuza Airport
  • Transfer from Skukuza Airport to Sabi Sabi Private Game Reserve
  • Your first afternoon game drive in Sabi Sands reserve
  • Romantic dinner at Sabi Sabi Safari Lodge
Sabi Sands
Day 8
Sabi Sands
  • Morning safari in Sabi Sands
  • Late afternoon game drive in Sabi Sands
Leopards at Kruger National Park
The second largest big cats in Africa are solitary and secretive and can be very difficult to catch sight of. Generally nocturnal, these graceful animals are not social creatures, and apart from mating season they seldom interact with other leopards. It's a strange existence really, as they don’t live in family groups or packs their time is largely spent lounging or hunting. A leopard’s hunting skills rely on the element of surprise, and the prey is either stalked or ambushed from a short distance away, until the leopard feels it can catch the prey. The leopard will then go from slow and stealthy movements to a burst of force and speed which will often be enough to reach its prey and kill it with a bite to the neck. They do not usually give chase for more than a short distance. Once their prey (usually antelopes) is killed or sufficiently weakened, the leopard will often drag it to hang in the branches of a tree, where it is safe from most scavengers and can be eaten more slowly and thoroughly. The precise number of leopards currently living in Kruger National Park is hard to pinpoint. Rangers who work in certain smaller zones have a very thorough knowledge of the leopards which roam on their patch, and can recognise leopards on sight from their unique facial markings, and will probably also have a detailed knowledge of their family tree, but over the park as a whole the exact numbers are not known. Suffice to say you are very lucky if you get to see one as they are shy and elusive.
Day 9
Sabi Sands
  • Bush walk in Sabi Sands
  • Another afternoon game drive in Sabi Sands
Sabi Sands
Day 10
Sabi Sands
  • Morning safari in Sabi Sands
  • Another afternoon game drive in Sabi Sands
Springbok
The name for this species of antelope comes from the Afrikaans for ‘jumping goat.’ Spring means jump and bok means goat. And jump it certainly does. Springboks are known for their ‘stotting’ or ‘pronking’ behaviour, where they spring around 2 metres straight upwards with all four feet off the ground, backs arched and head angled down. There are many theories to account for this behaviour, among them the idea that this is a defensive mechanism against being attacked. There could be multiple reasons for the jumping, such as the springbok attempting to look for predators, although by springing up into the air out of the camouflage of the vegetation they are arguably advertising their presence. Another theory is that they do it to demonstrate agility and fitness, to show any predators lurking nearby that they would not be worth chasing as they are supremely fit and healthy. It would also be a signal to a predator that it has been seen and so has lost the element of surprise. The reasons are still unclear, but for the animal to perform this action takes energy so it is believed that there must be an advantage to stotting.
Day 11
Johannesburg
  • Transfer from Sabi Sands to Skukuza Airport
  • Flight from Skukuza Airport to Johannesburg International Airport
  • Transfer from Johannesburg airport to guest house
Belle Mare
Day 12
Belle Mare
  • Transfer from Johannesburg airport to guest house
  • Flight from Johannesburg to Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam International Airport
  • Transfer from Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam International Airport to Belle Mare
Belle Mare
Day 13
Belle Mare
  • At leisure in Belle Mare
Belle Mare
Day 14
Belle Mare
  • A second day at leisure at Belle Mare
Belle Mare
Day 15
Belle Mare
  • A third day at leisure at Belle Mare
Belle Mare
Day 16
Belle Mare
  • Private speed boat tour
Day 17
No locations for this day
  • Transfer from Belle Mare to Mauritius Airport